Useful info

 
Getting around in Budapest
Travel Budapest, currency, hungarian forint
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Travel Hungary by train
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Budapest nightlife, Cinetrip
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Useful info
Pesti Diszno
Onyx Budapest
Useful info
Bock Bisztro
Mástészta Budapest Restaurant
Retro Dining Budapest Kádar étkezde
 

Budapest Card logo

General Travel Info

Time zone

CET +1
In Summer Time the sun comes up around 5 am and time of the sunset is around 9 pm. During the winter time the sunny hours are no more than 10-11 hours, between 6 am and 4 pm.

Electricity

220 / 230 V;  2 holes plug like almost everywhere in Europe.

Currency

The forint (Hungarian abbreviation is Ft and the international sign is HUF) is the official currency of Hungary. The name of the currency comes from the word Florence (The Italian City), where golden coins were minted from 1252 - called Italian coin florin.
As Hungary’s main goal is the deeper integration to the EU, as soon as the economic situation is compatible, the government will change the currency to euro.

actual exchange rates

Average Prices
 
bread 1 kg: 1.0 eur
gyros (kebab) sandwich: 2.5 eur
chinese menu: from 2.5 eur
beer 0.5 liter: from 1.5 eur
bottle of (fine) wine: from 3.5 eur
pack of cigarette: from 3 eur
public transport ticket: 1.163 eur (350 HUF)

Weather

Hungary is a 4-season country so the weather is quite predictable: count on freeze from November to February and don’t forget your sun cream from May to August but raincoats can be useful year round.
Weather Forecast: http://www.weatherinhungary.com

 

Getting Around

BUS-METRO-TRAM

Through the advanced transportation network  you may get in Budapest 7/24 practically anywhere.  The night buses cover the whole city. During the day more than 180 buses, 14 trolley-buses (electric-powered buses), 29 trams and 4 metro lines are working. Along these lines there are several historically significant and interesting alternative transport vehicles to serve the public, like the Budavári Sikló (Funicular-Railway) at the Castle district with the spectacular view of the Pest side during the trip, the Fogaskerekű (cog-railway) which goes to the Buda hills  or even a Libegő (Chairlift) that goes to János-hill.

public transportation lines, timetables, rates and route maps

Budapest Card

The 1-, 2- or 3-day Budapest Card permits unlimited travel on public transport, free or discounted entry to 60 museums and other sights as well as discounts in restaurants, spas and other services. Rates: 4900 HUF for 24 hours, 7900 HUF for 48 hours, 9900 HUF for 72 hours. 

More details: www.budapestinfo.hu

 

 

Taxi

In Budapest there are many reliable taxi companies but also plenty of taxis that do not belong to any taxi association and that you’d better avoid. Fares and taxi signs vary, but all of the taxis have a yellow plate and a ‘taxi’ sign on the top.
It is not only adventurous to take a taxi on the street – where there is a serious chance to find an overcharging ‘hyena’ taxi with no company control – but it is also more expensive. All serious taxi companies have a 24/24 dispatch number with English speaking operators so if you have the possibility, call a taxi on phone or ask someone to order it for you. Phone  ordered taxis are cheaper, safer and they pick you up anytime and anywhere within 5-10 minutes.
Underguide works with one of the major Taxi companies, City Taxi that you can reach directly at: +36 1 2222 222

From / To Airport

Budapest Ferihegy International  Airport (www.bud.hu, general (flight information): +36 1 296-7155 is located about 20 km from Budapest. It has 2 terminals a few km from each other: Terminal 1 for the budget flights and Terminal 2 (A and B) for all others.

To tell the truth, the Airport is not very well connected with Budapest downtown by public transport: you have a choice between a train and a bus and then you have to take the metro, but both take about 1-1.5 hours to get downtown and you need to change at least one time. For exact information contact the tourist info desk upon arrival.

Airport Shuttle:

Good deal if you travel on your own (about 16 euros). Reliable and quick and you can simply take it upon arrival at the Airportshuttle desk.
more info: www.airportshuttle.hu/en

Taxi:

At the airport you will only find cars of the official taxi company, Főtaxi of the airport. Tey have fixed rates for zones. Check the zone's rates here - getting to downtown is 21 euros.

If you prefer to book your taxi transfer in advance, send us a request to contact@underguide.com and we’ll book it for you.

For more on transfer, check our subpage on the topic.

Roads/Motorways

The motorway network in Hungary is Budapest centred: all the 5 highways meet at the capital. The M0 is a ring-road which connects these 5 highways and reduces Budapest cargo- and transit traffic. Buying e-vignettes for motorways is a must but rates are reasonable and you can purchase them at all fuel stations, by sms or on the Internet 

Speed limits (km/hour) for passenger cars and motorbikes:
motorway - 130 / main road  - 110 / other road - 90/ cities - 50

Phoning and useful numbers

International dial number of Hungary: +36, of Budapest regional dial number: 1 (so calling a Budapest phone form aboraod would be +36 1 ...)

International calls: 00 + dial number of country + telephone number

Cell phone calls: 00 + 36 + operate numbers (20 / 30 / 70) + telephone number (seven digits)

Home call: 06 + regional dial number + local telephone number

Telephone numbers: Budapest: seven-digit, countryside: six-digit

Public phones: most of them work with phone cards, but some with 50, 100 forint coins. Phone cards are available in post offices, newsagents /newspaper shops and tobacconists.

Central emergency number: 112

Ambulance: 104 (in English: 311 1666)

Fire: 105

Police: 107

Telephone Enquiries - International Operator: 190

Other Useful Contacts

• Non-stop pharmacies downtown:
2nd district Frankel Leo u. 22. -  Margaret Bridge - Buda side
6th district Teréz krt 41. - near  Oktogon
12th district Alkotas utca 1/b. , at Déli Railway station

• International Bus Info: 252-1896 (Mon-Fri 6am to 6pm)

• MAV railway ticket office (Budapest district 6, Andrassy ut 73-75.): 322-8082

• Ministry of Foreign Affairs - Hungarian entry and stay rules

• International e-newspapers in Hungary:
http://www.budapestsun.com/
http://www.budapesttimes.hu/
http://funzine.hu/
http://www.bestofbudapest.com/home.html
http://www.budapester.hu/
http://www.foaia.hu/
http://www.neue-zeitung.hu/
http://www.pesterlloyd.net/

Going out

If you decided to go out on your own and not with us :), let us give you few ideas to quickly adapt to the nightlife customs of Budapest. Hungarians are used to going out quite a lot: Monday and Tuesday are quiet with few international parties or karaoke bars, Wednesday the city starts to move and the night gets full of youngsters and students, Thursday is absolutely student party night and Friday and Saturday are the “normal” party days.

 

People start to warm up with beers, ‘fröccs’-es (local wine spritzer type) and some good Pálinka (our fruit based spirits) at about 7 pm in pubs & ruin bars and leave to party places & clubs around 10-11pm. Most clubs are open until 4-5 am but you won’t have problems to find after-parties or clubs closing at 8-9 in the morning. Dinner time is between 6pm – 10 pm, so late dinner plans are not easy to realize.

When you ask for the bill please do not forget that average tipping is 10% (check the bill – in upper class restau-bars it may be included) and the usual way of tipping is to ‘ask back’ from a 10% higher amount than the bill is. Over billing used to be a problem years ago; today most of these places have been closed but it still happens, so check your bill in details before paying. 
During the summer the townspeople’s favourites are the open air bars & clubs and Budapest is abounded in them. If you are here in the season don’t miss them: there is no better feeling than to lay down on the grass in the busy downtown or to dance next to the Danube. Normally the open air clubs are free or just charge a symbolic entree fee. And do not forget that Hungary is the country of the festivals, from the beginning of June ‘till September you always have at least one festival somewhere in Hungary.

Budapest - besides the festivals, the ruin bars or the summer open-air places – is full of clubs and discos. We do not dare to recommend party places to you because each has its own style. But before you choose you’d better ask local people or us to find the best party of your taste or to go out with us.

The night buses are available every night of the week. The taxi drivers hunt for customers during the night, but before getting into the taxi just fix the fee or simply order a taxi by phone (it is chaper and safer!).

Budapest nightlife - you won’t be disappointed!

 

    

 

   

Restaurants

Pesti Disznó

Ever heard of a traditional/modern Hungarian tapas bar? Neither did we, until we discovered the wonderfully refreshing ‘Pesti Disznó’ , and a new-yet-traditional interpretation of Hungarian gastronomy.

Located right in the centre of Budapest, Oktogon, just off Andrássy Utca, Pesti Disznó offers traditional Hungarian cuisine, in a non-traditional manner. Where traditional Hungarian dishes are heavy or filling, the dishes offered here are light and easy to eat. This little tapas restaurant really gives meaning to the term ‘quality over quantity’, and it was the perfect location for our monthly training session held for the guides, with the most appropriate topic at hand... gastronomy!

https://www.facebook.com/PestiDiszno

Onyx

One of only two Michelin Star resteraunts in Budapest, Onyx offers incredible food, at absolute reasonable prices. Despite the 1 Michelin star,  lunches are in fact at an affordable price, the weekly special is a 2-course menu for 3,490 HUF (approx. 13 euros) and a 3-course menu for 3,990 HUF (approx. 15 euros), which truly is great value for money..!

As for the sizes of portions, tourist reviews vary, but most found them good size, while few were complaining about tiny portions. One of the guests remarked “ In my opinion, you need to have many courses to truly appreciate the quality of this restaurant.” And another TripAdvisor reviewer wrote “If you’re from Texas and looking for a big steak, this probably isn’t the place for you. ”

 

http://restaurants.topbudapest.org/michelin/onyx-restaurant-budapest

http://www.onyxrestaurant.hu/en

 

Costes

Costes, a restaurant located in Budapest, became the first in Hungary, and the second in the central and Eastern European region after Prague’s Allegro, to own a Michelin-star, Hungarian gastronomy blog Otthon edes said.

Costes, which offers a fusion cuisine of modern international and Hungarian dishes, is partly owned by festival tycoon Karoly Gerendai, the founding father of Hungary’s most popular summer festival Sziget.

http://www.costes.hu/ 


Bock Bisztró

One of Budapest's highest rated Restaurants on TripAdvisor, Bock Bisztró offers great food for good value, with friendly service and a wonderful atomosphere! The bistro shop boasts a selection of more than two hundred types of wine and the restaurant itself serves a quality of food that is simply marvellous. If you're a fan of venison, wild duck and pork, then you'll probably find at Bock some of the best and most mouth watering dishes on offer in the whole country.

Dining at the Bock Bisztró should be on your itinerary of things to do and places to see when visiting Budapest; it's open Monday to Saturday from 11am to 11pm. But be warned, this is a popular restaurant, so book in advance!

 

http://www.bockbisztro.hu/en/

 

Mástészta

Mástészta is a 'food design studio' which explore the relationship between gastronomy and design. They analyze and redesign the traditional gastronomic way of thinking. 

Absolutely worth checking out... 

https://www.facebook.com/masteszta

 

Kádár Étkezde

Interested in how Hungarians dined in the 70's? Known to locals as Uncle Kadar's place, this home-style family restaurant has been around for enough to have more than one generation of fans. The walls are decorated with photos of celebrities from years gone by and the tables are topped with old-fashioned spritzer bottles.

Good old-fashioned Hungarian Jewish cooking is the thing here (not kosher, though); think stuffed kohlrabi, káposztás kocka (cabbage pasta), and lots of boiled beef. If you go, you have to try the delicious raspberry drink. It's only open from 11:30 to 3:30, so it truly is just a lunch place! But well worth checking out if retro dining is what you are into! 

 

For more info & Picture Gallery: https://www.facebook.com/groups/10557922147/photos/